News Articles

Sense and Sustainability at Boulder Ice Cream

Today was a special day for Boulder Ice Cream: it was the first day of production at their sweet new creamery in Boulder. We stopped in for a visit with president and founder, Scott Roy. Scott and his team have been making ice cream in Boulder since 1992 and they have continued to innovate and organically grow over the years. I wanted to take some photos of the facility and asked Scott what he was most proud of. I was assuming that he would point me toward the gleaming stainless steel tanks, or the gorgeous new pasteurizer, or perhaps the intricate network of copper piping whose beauty rivals some art installations I’ve seen. I was pretty surprised when Scott told me that what he was most proud of was in the mechanical room.

Scott and his design team built the production facility with sustainability in mind. The most energy intensive aspects of ice cream production are keeping finished product frozen, like really frozen at -20, and heating water to wash down the make room after production. If only there was a way to somehow harness the heat generated by the refrigeration systems to heat the water needed to clean… Well, that’s exactly what they did.

There's cold and then there's cold. The blast freezer is set to a frosty -32. This refrigeration equipment throws off quite a bit of heat.

There’s cold and then there’s cold. The blast freezer is set to a frosty -32. This refrigeration equipment throws off quite a bit of heat. The heat is captured and used to reduce the heating loads of the domestic hot water system.

These are the hot water heaters which consume a lot less energy due to the heat generated by the refrigeration equipment. In the winter when production slows the heat from the refrigeration units is diverted into the building and then circulated to reduce heating costs.

These are the hot water heaters which consume a lot less energy due to the heat generated by the refrigeration equipment. In the winter when production slows the heat from the refrigeration units is diverted into the building and then circulated to reduce heating costs.

 

Big Ass Fan

When Scott told me he installed a “big ass” fan he wasn’t joking around. Big Ass Fans is a division of Big Ass Solutions based in Lexington, Kentucky. Their fans offer a way to move a massive volume of air very quietly and without consuming much energy.

 

Testing out the sweet new batch dating machine. We all had a good laugh when we realized that it actually worked as designed! Anyone who has ever commissioned a production facility knows that sophisticated systems often require as much care and feeding as a baby goat to get on their feet.

Testing out the sweet new batch dating machine. We all had a good laugh when we realized that it actually worked as designed! Anyone who has ever commissioned a production facility knows that sophisticated systems often require as much care and feeding as a baby goat to get on their feet.

Cheers to Scott and his team for building out this smart, sustainable creamery – we have a huge culinary crush on you guys! Wishing you years of sustainable production in your beautiful new home!

 

 

 

Haystack Mountain Cheese Vaults: onions and cheese, ne’er the twain shall meet.

Cheeses can easily pick up odors from other foods in your fridge. In an attempt to minimize this phenomenon, we’ve created these beautiful, handmade wooden cheese vaults. They’ll help to prevent cheeses from absorbing off-flavors from other like onions, fish, and two-week-old sushi leftovers.

Our cheese vaults also make great gifts for the cheese lovers in your life, as well as an elegant way to present them with a custom cheese sampler (we’ll help you put it together).  The vaults alone are $20, or free with a purchase of $50 or more. Give us a call at (720)494-8714, or stop by the creamery to get yours today.

Haystack Mountain Cheese Valut: A great way to present and store cheeses.

Haystack Mountain Cheese Valut: A great way to present and store cheeses.

 

 

Haystack Mountain Makes 5280′s “Food Lover’s” issue

We’re honored to have made the September, “Food Lover’s Guide to Denver” issue of 5280. Check out page 64, where food editor Amanda Faison starts the Cheese section off by calling Haystack ‘s offerings “refrigerator staples.” That’s what we like to hear!

The section is a round-up of the best Colorado specialty cheeses, including our pasteurized, mixed milk baby, Buttercup. Made with our goat milk and cow’s milk from Windsor Dairy  and Aurora Organic Dairy, we like to think of Buttercup as being, “the way Velveeta should taste.”

Buttercup’s name and signature pale yellow color is the result of the high beta-carotene content in the grass foraged by the cows.  Each four-pound wheel is dipped in wax, and aged for 30 to 60 days. The result is a mild, easygoing, semi-soft cheese that’s  incredibly versatile.  Use it as a melter, slicer, grater, or snacker. Kids go crazy for it, but obviously, more than a few grown-ups do, as well.

Murray’s Cheese: Cave-Aged Haystack Peak and Tremblay Honey

Click here for more information about Murry’s Cave-Aged Haystack Peak and Tremblay Honey. It’s not your average goat cheese!

American Beauties

How to pair wines with artisan cheeses, by Bill St. John, Special to Tribune Newspapers. Click here to read the full article.

A Sampling of Flavorful Colorado-made Goat Cheeses

By Lesli J. Neilson, The Salt Lake Tribune. Click here to read the full article.

A Cheese Movement

Read the full write-up in the New York Times.

Whole Foods preview: Expansion brings lots of tasty choices

Read in the Boulder Daily Camera.

500 Cheeses by Roberta Muir

For Immediate Release 21 August 2010

The fact that there can even be a book called 500 Cheeses is testament to the incredible diversity of these beloved fermented milk products, produced virtually worldwide from the milk of almost every domesticated herbivore, including horses, camels, and reindeer.

500 Cheeses describes the world’s most commonly known cheeses, including those recognized under appellation systems, as well as some of the more unusual ones, such as Nepalese yak’s milk cheese and Filipino kesong puti. From simple cottage cheeses once produced in every home, through artisanal cheeses undergoing a renaissance in the USA, UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, to some of the world’s most loved mass-produced products, 500 Cheeses has it covered. [Read more...]

Goat cheese: From the pen to the plate

Read in The Denver Post